Local, Stormy, Brandi Bowers-Christiansen, Chantel Kebrdle, Morgan Metzger are planning a trip to Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. (Not pictured but also going is Laura Christiansen)  (Herald photo / provided)
Local, Stormy, Brandi Bowers-Christiansen, Chantel Kebrdle, Morgan Metzger are planning a trip to Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. (Not pictured but also going is Laura Christiansen) (Herald photo / provided)
There is a battle happening right now on many of our major rivers in the United States.  A $3.7 billion project, the Dakota Access Pipeline would cross four states from North Dakota to Illinois. Also known as the ‘Black Snake’, it’s owned by a private corporation and is being constructed in order to carry fracked oil across our nation threatening our water resources.  

This pipeline is currently being constructed through the Sioux treaty land and is desecrating sacred burial grounds. Thousands of people have joined our nation’s tribes to stand in solidarity against what is happening and to speak up for our rivers and water.  Despite a request to halt further development and boring under the Missouri River by the Army Corp. of Engineers, Dakota Access Pipeline work continues.

Last weekend I traveled to Cincinnati, Ohio to join an event with the American Indian Movement chapters of Indiana and Kentucky.  I listened as elders and chiefs from various tribes spoke about what is happening in North Dakota.  I stood in prayer circle with them as they sang in their native tongue, songs of prayers for our nation, our tribal treaty lands and our rivers.   It was very touching and I felt the extreme sadness shared by many.  

How would we feel if a private corporation wanted to dig up Arlington National Cemetery, or our own ancestor’s graves?  How will we feel when our clean water is gone?

As a long time boater and being passionate about our rivers, I feel an immense need to become active in voicing concerns for the protection of our water and to join with others as water protectors gathering at the Missouri River in North Dakota.  I refuse to paddle on or drink oil!  I was furious to see unarmed people standing in the water getting sprayed with chemicals by security forces two weeks ago.

There are many here in Kokomo who also share my same vision.  A group has joined me and will travel to Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota.  Our desire is to serve where needed over Thanksgiving  and stand with others in unison to speak out against this ‘black snake’ which threatens to destroy the Missouri and Mississippi rivers downstream all the way to the Gulf Of Mexico and the tribe’s sole source of drinking water in the aquifer under the reservation. 

We must each look to self and ask what I can do to make a difference in this world. It is time for all of us to look within ourselves and see what we can do to minimalize our own use of fossil fuels and our footprint on our environment.  We can spread the word about what is happening, write letters to our elected officials calling for the stop of this pipeline, we can withdraw our funds from the banks supporting this corporation or we can go in person to Standing Rock.

If you feel called to contribute financially or wish to donate supplies to send with us, supply lists are available at the locations listed below.  The deadline for drop-off is Sunday, November 20.

A Lakota is called this because of the language he/she speaks.  We are each defined and identified because of our culture but we are all one, indigenous from this place we call planet earth.   We are taught culture, but we all are related!  Your color is immaterial....we are born as humans!  We need to respect each other, get along and embrace our differences.  Our tribes gathering in North Dakota are a prayerful people.  Don’t mistake this for weakness, for this is strength when nations of people gather in peace!   

Each of us live downstream from pipelines and fracking throughout our nation.  I don’t want to look at my grandchildren and tell them I did nothing!

Stormy
adventureswithstormy.com

Donation lists and collection sites are located at:

The Sunspot Natural Market, 3717 S Reed Rd., Mon.-Sat. from 9 a.m.-8 p.m. and Sun. from 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

The Jitterbug, 119 W. Sycamore St., Tues. – Fri. from 11 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sat. from 10 a.m.-3 p.m.